Weekly Newsletter from Christian Vegetarian Association CVA - September 5, 2018
From Christian Vegetarian Association (CVA)


  1. Sad News
  2. CVA Booklet Reprint
  3. Original Sin, part 45: Forgiveness and Accountability
  4. From All-Creatures.org Ministry

1. Sad News

Mary T. Hoffman passed away Saturday, August 25 with Frank holding her hand. Founded and created by Mary and Frank Hoffman, All-Creatures.org is a profound reflection of both Mary and Frank's unwavering love for ALL of God's creatures. Theirs was an inspiring marriage of 57 years grounded in that love and their respect for each other. Please keep Frank in your hearts.

I will miss Mary as well, having met her at several veg. events. She was a kind and compassionate person.


2. CVA Booklet Reprint

We will be printing more “Joyful, Compassionate Living” booklets in the near future. Please send comments and suggestions to [email protected]


3. Original Sin, part 45: Forgiveness and Accountability

It is crucial to hold people accountable for their actions, because fear of consequences prevents bad behavior. If having a “beloved community” requires that we forgive each other, how can we hold people accountable for harmful behavior?

I think we can simultaneously forgive those who have harmed us or members of our community while still holding them accountable. We might still punish people or separate dangerous people from the rest of society while offering forgiveness. This forgiveness is not just words, because we can say, “I forgive” while our actions show, bitterness, and a thirst for revenge. Real forgiveness involves genuine compassion and concern for the perpetrator of harmful behavior and a desire to minimize harm to that individual while protecting society at large.

How can we tell whether our actions are motivated by vengeance or by a desire to minimize harm to all individuals? One way is to assess our feelings. If we feel anger and bitterness toward someone, or if we feel pleasure thinking about the suffering a perpetrator might feel, then our motives are not coming from a place of love or forgiveness. If we feel sadness for the harm experienced by perpetrators, we are more likely coming from a place of love and forgiveness.

Since we can deceive ourselves about our motivations and feelings, it can be helpful to get feedback from impartial third parties who do not have an emotional, financial, or material interest in whether a person is punished for harmful behavior.

Stephen R. Kaufman, M.D.


4. From All-Creatures.org Ministry


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